Facts on Breastfeeding – 3

Continuing last post.. some more facts on Breastfeeding recommended by WHO are…

Regulating breast-milk substitutes

An international code to regulate the marketing of breast-milk substitutes was adopted in 1981. It calls for: all formula labels and information to state the benefits of breastfeeding and the health risks of substitutes; no promotion of breast-milk substitutes; no free samples of substitutes to be given to pregnant women, mothers or their families; and no distribution of free or subsidized substitutes to health workers or facilities.

Support for mothers is essential

Breastfeeding has to be learned and many women encounter difficulties at the beginning. Many routine practices, such as separation of mother and baby, use of newborn nurseries, and supplementation with infant formula, actually make it harder for mothers and babies to breastfeed. Health facilities that support breastfeeding by avoiding these practices and making trained breastfeeding counsellors available to new mothers encourage higher rates of the practice. To provide this support and improve care for mothers and newborns, there are “baby-friendly” facilities in about 152 countries thanks to the WHO-UNICEF Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative.

Work and breastfeeding

Many mothers who return to work abandon breastfeeding partially or completely because they do not have sufficient time, or a place to breastfeed, express and store their milk. Mothers need a safe, clean and private place in or near their workplace to continue breastfeeding. Enabling conditions at work, such as paid maternity leave, part-time work arrangements, on-site crèches, facilities for expressing and storing breast milk, and breastfeeding breaks, can help.

The next step: phasing in solid foods

To meet the growing needs of babies at six months of age, mashed solid foods should be introduced as a complement to continued breastfeeding. Foods for the baby can be specially prepared or modified from family meals. WHO notes that: breastfeeding should not be decreased when starting on solids; food should be given with a spoon or cup, not in a bottle; food should be clean and safe; and ample time is needed for young children to learn to eat solid foods.

So.. This is it…. Spread the awareness and make our community healthier by born…

Thank you so much for being here on my blog… 😊

Keep visiting

☺ STAY HEALTHY, STAY HAPPY ☺

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